Long cold February equals “frozen” Niagara Falls

I’ve probably mentioned it before – I not a fan of winter.  I love Canada, but honestly, what were my ancestors thinking!

This is generally the point in any given winter when cabin fever is reaching a fever pitch.  Luckily, this past Saturday was a balmy -8C so we thought we’d go see Niagara Falls for interesting photo opps.  There had been some news items about the “frozen” Niagara Falls.

Unfortunately, when we arrived in Niagara Falls (only 25 minutes away) the weather was not the same as it was at home.  In fact, it was snowing enough to obscure longer views and make the lighting conditions even more of a challenge.  However, we made lemonade with the lemons and I even ended up having fun on a cold winter’s day!

Now, if you aren’t from the area I’m going to spoil the headlines for you by telling you that the Falls never freeze over.  There is just too much water flowing over them, and the power generators (companies) expend a lot of effort controlling the volume of water (frozen rivers don’t generate electricity).  If you are interested you can read more here (and it IS interesting).   There is a lot of ice though, from the spray off the Falls – that’s what makes it interesting.

I’m showing you what I captured on the Canadian side today.

Of course, I'm going to be finding interesting shapes, ice build-up, lights and darks, and textures!
Of course, I’m going to be finding interesting shapes, ice build-up, lights and darks, and textures!
I love how the ice followed the twists of the design.  Kind of like enameling!
I love how the ice followed the twists of the design. Kind of like enameling!

cdn falls3

This part of the barrier (and the previous photos) are on the approach to the Horseshoe falls, so there is not quite as much ice build up.
This part of the barrier (and the previous photos) are on the approach to the Horseshoe falls, so there is not quite as much ice build up.  The background is the frozen river (below the falls).
I know this isn't the best photo, which is why I explained above.  This is what it looked like due to the snow falling.
I know this isn’t the best photo, which is why I explained above. This is what it looked like due to the snow falling – here we are looking across to the American and Bridal falls..  The river below the falls is frozen. 
Back to fun ice formations!  This was the most spectacular of the iced up lights.
Back to fun ice formations! This was the most spectacular of the iced up lights.
I don't actually remember if this snag is living or not, but it certainly makes an interesting foreground to the Horseshoe falls.
I don’t actually remember if this snag is living or not, but it certainly makes an interesting foreground to the Horseshoe falls.
Now I'm standing at the top of the Horseshoe falls - you can see the incredible ice on the barrier.
Now I’m standing at the top of the Horseshoe falls – you can see the incredible ice on the barrier.
This is the Niagara River flowing from Lake Erie.  If you look closely you can see little chunks of ice that will be going over the falls short.y.  Also, if you look even closer you should see a black dot in the river....
This is the Niagara River flowing from Lake Erie. If you look closely you can see little chunks of ice that will be going over the falls shortly.  That water sure looked cold! Also, if you look even closer you should see a black dot in the river….

That black dot (more or less in the center of the photo is a duck (a scaup).  After I took this photo I was watching the river.  It is moving quite fast here (not surprisingly) and it was interesting to see the ice in it.  Anyhow, before I could get myself together to get the camera on it – the duck came zooming by, riding the waves – and went right over the falls!  The ultimate in extreme sports!

Who is this guy?  Can you spot his nose?
Who is this guy?  Can you spot his nose?
Another view a bit further up river, with some cold tourists.
Another view a bit further up river, with some cold tourists.  You can see all of the trees and bushes are covered in ice (or frozen snow).

 

Tomorrow, the American side because once you’ve put all those layers of clothes on you might as well keep going!

Hope you are keeping warm!

Valerie

2 Responses to Long cold February equals “frozen” Niagara Falls

  1. Wow Valerie, spectacular images and thanks for explaining. LOL Love that you question your ancestors and they moved there in the years before central heating. Sending you warm wished from my side of the globe. <3

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