Fun at the bench!

I made a decision at the beginning of September!  I know, it’s always good to make a decision!

This one was specifically about actually designing jewellery that uses stones from my (growing) collection!  Crazy, eh…  I’m trying hard not to become an official and acknowledged hoarder of stones.  It’s hard because I see so many pretty ones, and the stones I am attracted to are not ones you can plan on buying later.  Often the cut, color or type of stone are unusual – so what’s a girl to do!  Buy it, of course!  That leads to my “little problem” of too many gemstones.  Actually, now that I write that, it doesn’t seem to be that bad of a problem to have!

Anyhow, at the bench, I kickstarted this project with two rings.

The first one, “Tectonic shift” was technically interesting to make because I explored metal forming techniques that I had read about in making the ring.  Usually you fabricate a ring by starting with a flat, parallel sided “ring blank” (as the unformed shank is called) and shape it into a circle.  This ring was shaped from a curved piece of sterling using hammer forming techniques.  I think it turned out quite well, and it is very comfortable to wear!

But where do the stones come into this story, you ask?  Well, once I finished forming it, and had made the cast focal piece I felt the ring had a real geological, natural feel to it.  I have had some Canadian emerald(s) in my collection for sometime and thought one of them would be perfect.

Tectonic shift ring.  The emerald is from the Northwest Territories.
Tectonic shift ring. The emerald is from the Northwest Territories.
The back of "Tectonic Shift", showing the texture and curves of the ring.
The back of “Tectonic Shift”, showing the texture and curves of the ring.

The second ring started with the stone, a cute Amazonite cabochon that I’ve had for some time.  I thought it was the perfect size for a ring and so created a design specifically for it.  I also thought the size of the stone lent itself to adding some decorative elements!  I always enjoy using decorative techniques in my work.  However, it is lacking a fancy name – instead it is the “straightforward” Amazonite ring:

Amazonite ring.  I paired the amazonite with a pink tube set lab grown sapphire.  Very cute!!
Amazonite ring. I paired the amazonite with a pink tube set lab grown sapphire. Very cute!!
The back of the Amazonite ring.  I enjoyed the reflections in this photo.
The back of the Amazonite ring. I enjoyed the reflections in this photo; and yes, the decorative elements continue on the back!

There are more pieces being made with my gemstones – keep tuned!

Valerie

 

 

 

 

 

 

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